OU researchers jump into the storm to study the effects

We know that Hurricane Ida is likely to intensify into a Category 4 hurricane before it hits. A team of research meteorologists from the University of Oklahoma headed for Louisiana ahead of the storm. Researchers at Norman make final preparations for deployment to Hurricane Ida. You will be heading for the major hurricane expected on the Louisiana coast on Sunday and will take radar trucks and other equipment into the storm to investigate it. “What’s new after experiencing a dozen or more of these storms?” asked the OU meteorology professor Michael Biggerstaff. “Well, there’s always something new.” The National Institutes of Standards and Technologies fund the effort to improve building codes and standards for future storms. “The climate will change and there could be stronger and wetter storms in the future,” Biggerstaff said. He said his team would go into the storm but keep out of his sight the west side of the eyewall and let the storm cross the region where both radars are scanning, ”he said. The research will benefit Oklahoma as well. “If we’re interested in the extreme winds that occur in a microburst or rectilinear wind storm, or if we’re interested in tornadoes, why not go somewhere where the atmosphere produces all of that , and a hurricane is exactly that environment, “he said. Another focus is the detection of extreme floods. Last year Louisiana was badly hit and inland flooding was a major problem. “I feel sorry for the people affected by these storms, and I think it’s our job to try and improve the weather forecast,” he said. So while Ida may not be headed straight for Oklahoma, researchers will find out Turning Sooner State towards the storm in hopes of getting better data to predict.

We know that Hurricane Ida is likely to intensify into a Category 4 hurricane before it hits.

A team of research meteorologists from the University of Oklahoma travels to Louisiana before the storm.

Researchers at Norman make final preparations for deployment to Hurricane Ida. You will be heading for the major hurricane expected on the Louisiana coast on Sunday and will bring radar trucks and other equipment into the storm to investigate it.

“What’s new after experiencing a dozen or more of these storms?” Asked OU meteorology professor Michael Biggerstaff. “Well, there is always something new.”

The National Institutes of Standards and Technologies are funding the effort to improve building codes and standards for future storms.

“The climate will change and there could be stronger and wetter storms in the future,” Biggerstaff said.

He said his team would go into the storm but stay out of his sight.

“So hopefully we’ll be on the west side of the Eyewall and the storm will sweep through the area where both radars are scanning,” he said.

The research will also benefit Oklahoma.

“If we’re interested in the extreme winds that occur in a microburst or straight line windstorm, or if we’re interested in tornadoes, then why not go somewhere where the atmosphere produces everything? That, and a hurricane is exactly this environment, ”he said.

Another focus is the localization of extreme floods. Last year Louisiana was badly hit and inland flooding was a major problem.

“I feel sorry for the people who have been hit by these storms and I think it is our job to try to improve the weather forecast,” he said.

So while Ida may not be headed straight for Oklahoma, researchers from Sooner State will be turning to the storm in hopes of getting better data to predict.

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