Thunderstorms will hit the UK today with 12 HOURS of rainfall

Thunderstorms are set to plague Britain today – with 12 hours of rain in the country’s eastern areas from Newcastle to Brighton, up to two inches of rain and warnings from the Met Office of flooding and travel chaos – as daylight savings time comes to an end.

Whole parts of eastern England are expected to be hardest hit by torrential rains from noon to midnight before subsiding early Monday, while other parts of the country will experience much drier conditions when the Indian summer we enjoyed fades away.

The next week is not expected to be much better as conditions become more turbulent in the days to come. It’s a far cry from Saturday, which was poor and sunny conditions across much of the UK when sunbathers enjoyed temperature highs of 73 ° F.

A Met Office spokesman said: “It is forecast to rain quite a bit. A bright start to Sunday morning, especially the further east you are. But it will not stay that way if the rain moves eastwards in the course of the morning and afternoon.

“This rain will be heavy in the early afternoon in many eastern areas.

“Temperatures are generally a notch lower on Saturday, so it’s a cooler day for many with highs of 64 or 66, maybe 68 in the far south. On Sunday evening, this rain will continue to hit many in the east and will brighten from the west as the weather dries up.

LONDON BRIDGE: People in the rain near London Bridge Station on September 10, 2021 amidst rainfall

LONDON TOWER BRIDGE: Motorists drive through rainwater on flooded Tower Bridge Road in London on September 14, 2021

LONDON TOWER BRIDGE: Motorists drive through rainwater on flooded Tower Bridge Road in London on September 14, 2021

Thunderstorms will hit the UK today - with 12 hours of rain in the country's eastern areas from Newcastle to Brighton, up to two inches of rainfall and warnings from the Met Office of flooding and travel chaos - as summer draws to a close

Thunderstorms will hit the UK today – with 12 hours of rain in the country’s eastern areas from Newcastle to Brighton, up to two inches of rainfall and warnings from the Met Office of flooding and travel chaos – as summer draws to a close

A yellow <a class=weather warning is in place on Sunday as the British in the east of England will be hit by heavy rain and thunderstorms in a “relatively short time”, which could potentially lead to localized flooding” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

A yellow weather warning is in place on Sunday as the British in the east of England will be hit by heavy <a class=rain and thunderstorms in a “relatively short time”, which could potentially lead to localized flooding” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

A yellow weather warning is in place on Sunday as the British in the east of England will be hit by heavy rain and thunderstorms in a “relatively short time”, which could potentially lead to localized flooding

“On Monday, the weekend showers begin to subside, with longer, sunnier and drier periods developing on Tuesday and Wednesday that get choppy later in the week.”

Met Office forecaster Alex Deakin said, “The three main elements of the weather will be foggy in the morning, some heavy showers around – in fact, some big downpours are likely, but by no means for all – and there will be warm sunshine too.

“Basically we expect a little more clouds and a greater chance of heavy showers on Sunday. Some large downpours are possible. A lot of rain could fall in a relatively short time. “

A yellow weather warning applies on Sundays, during which the British in the east of England will be hit by heavy rain and thunderstorms in a “relatively short period of time”, which could potentially lead to localized flooding.

The Met Office has also warned that people in the affected areas could experience power outages and the loss of other services.

Met Office forecasters said: “A band of rain and heavy thunderstorms will slowly move east until Sunday before slowly moving across the highlighted area later in the day.

“If these showers slow down, 30 to 40 mm of rain could fall in a relatively short period of time, which can lead to surface water flooding and disruptions in transportation.”

Last week, London commuters battled flash floods on their way to work as portions of the North Circular and Blackwall Tunnels Northern Approach and underground services, including the District Line, remained submerged.

Crowds of people strolled along the seafront on Bournemouth Beach on Saturday before torrential rain today

Crowds of people strolled along the seafront on Bournemouth Beach on Saturday before torrential rain today

People enjoy Saturday's summer weather on Bournemouth promenade when temperatures peaked at around 75C

People enjoy Saturday’s summer weather on Bournemouth promenade when temperatures peaked at around 75C

Pictured: People jump into the sea in Bournemouth on Saturday in scorching temperatures and summer sunshine

Pictured: People jump into the sea in Bournemouth on Saturday in scorching temperatures and summer sunshine

Dramatic footage showed buses and cars struggling to get across the landmark bridge, while photos shared with MailOnline by angry Londoners also showed the A41 at Brent Cross Shopping Center and Euston Road in deep rainwater.

Much of the UK was basking in scorching sun earlier in the month, including Wales, which experienced its warmest September night on record, while temperatures in Scotland reached their highest temperatures since 1906.

But gray skies and temperatures in the late teens cheered the end of summer weather towards the middle of the month. Cars were plowed by the floods under a blanket of cloud on Tuesday morning in central London.

But only yesterday in Bournemouth a cheeky swimmer went out to sea as a Briton only in his birthday suit made the most of last summer.

Meanwhile, night owls at the Isle of Wight Festival put on their cheerful rags in brightly colored bell bottoms and statement shirts as they went to Seaclose Park in Newport for the third day of the Isle of Wight Festival.

They adopted this year’s theme of peace, love and understanding and wore bright colors and hippie clothes in the style of the 70s after last year’s festival was canceled due to Covid.

SWIMMERS WAIT FROM RIP ELECTRICITY HAZARD AS LIFE GUARD RESCUES OUTSIDE THE BODYBOARDER

The Coast Guard warned of the dangers of ripping currents after two lifeguards rescued a bodyboarder who fought at sea for half an hour.

The male got into trouble Saturday morning in the water off Perran Sands beach in Cornwall.

Lifeguards Charlie Florey and Ben Evans were on their way to work around 9:30 a.m. when they spotted him and acted immediately when he did not raise a hand on their call through the PA system.

Mr. Evans paddled out to find the bodyboarder “completely exhausted,” the RNLI said.

The Coast Guard has warned of the dangers of rip currents after two lifeguards rescued a bodyboarder who fought at sea for half an hour on Saturday morning off Perran Sands beach in Cornwall (file image)

The Coast Guard has warned of the dangers of rip currents after two lifeguards rescued a bodyboarder who fought at sea for half an hour on Saturday morning off Perran Sands beach in Cornwall (file image)

Mr Florey had called an ambulance and the two took the injured man to the beach rescue for treatment for exhaustion and illness after swallowing a lot of water.

The bodyboarder, for whom the RNLI did not have any information, was transferred to the care of paramedics when the rescue service arrived.

The lifeguards were praised for their “vigilance” and quick response.

Lifeguard Overseer Drustan Ward said, “Time was of the essence as the casualty was in trouble for about half an hour in the rift current and needed urgent help. We wish him a speedy recovery after his ordeal. “

Mr Ward warned that rift currents like the one on Saturday are difficult to spot but can sometimes be identified by “a channel with choppy, choppy water on the ocean surface.”

He added, “Even the most experienced beach goers and swimmers can get caught in cracks.

“If you can stand, don’t wade or swim. If you can, swim parallel to the bank until you get out of the rift, then go to the bank. Whenever possible, always raise your hand and call for help. ‘

Anyone who sees a person who might get into trouble in the water is advised to call 999 or 112 and ask about the Coast Guard.

The RNLI advised that people entering the water should visit patrolled beaches with lifeguards and stand between the red and yellow flags.

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